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Miami police officer was most likely drunk when she crashed the squad car

The Miami Herald finally got around to reporting the news that Sarah-Anne Hoyle had resigned from the Miami Police Department after she had wrecked a squad car early one February morning.

Of course we knew that already because I reported it more than two weeks ago.

What we didn’t k


The Miami Herald finally got around to reporting the news that Sarah-Anne Hoyle had resigned from the Miami Police Department after she had wrecked a squad car early one February morning.

Of course we knew that already because I reported it more than two weeks ago.

What we didn’t know is that Hoyle had a blood alcohol content of .047 six hours after she plowed the squad car into a parked van.

Six hours to sober up and she was still half-drunk.

And according to what Wikipedia, alcohol has  a “dissipation rate of around .015% per hour.”

So let’s do that math. Six times .0015 adds up to .09, which is above the legal limit of .08.

But let’s not forget the .047, which would mean she had about a .137 blood alcohol content level at the time of the accident.

No wonder she plowed into a van, stumbled out and allowed her police radio to fall out of her purse as she rummaged for her driver license.

And no wonder she refused to give a statement. And no wonder she refused a sobriety test at the time of the accident.

Police said they did not have enough “probable cause” to demand a sobriety test at the time even though one sergeant said she reeked of alcohol.

There was not enough evidence of alcohol impairment for officers to demand a sobriety test, though ”one sergeant detected an odor of alcohol,” the report said.

Instead, they fed her apples, allowing her to sober up for six hours before they administered the test.

This was the second time she wrecked a car during her three-year stint with the police department.

But police believe she has a bright future ahead of her.

”This whole thing is unfortunate because she was a smart, good police officer, and I’m sure she’ll have a bright future wherever she goes,” Moss said.

I was planning on finishing this up with a rant against the corruption of the Miami Police Department and the ineptitude of the Miami Herald, but what’s the point?

We, as citizens of Miami, are truly alone.

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