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Man charged with disorderly conduct for photographing women in public

An Illinois man who enjoys secretly taking pictures of women walking to their cars in public parking lots was arrested for disorderly conduct last week.

Ronald Witt, 45, has been doing this for years because he was arrested for the same thing in 2006 although it is not clear if he was con


An Illinois man who enjoys secretly taking pictures of women walking to their cars in public parking lots was arrested for disorderly conduct last week.

Ronald Witt, 45, has been doing this for years because he was arrested for the same thing in 2006 although it is not clear if he was convicted for that arrest.

When police searched his home after his most recent arrest, they found more than 80 photos of various women walking through various parking lots.

How police get to search his home on a disorderly conduct charge is beyond me.

And while his behavior may seem creepy, anti-social and obsessive, is it illegal?

That might be up to a judge because the Illinois law states that “a person commits disorderly conduct when he knowingly does any act in such unreasonable manner as to alarm or disturb another and to provoke a breach of the peace.”

So it boils down to whether a judge believes the act of taking pictures in public is acting in an “unreasonable manner” because it is evident he alarmed the women he photographed because he also followed them.

According to the local new report:

A woman called Deerfield police Oct. 6 to say she was being stalked. She said that three different times in recent days she had seen a man sitting in his car and watching her walk to her vehicle after work.

According to the police report, Witt followed the woman out of a parking lot and onto Lake Cook Road, and the woman feared for her safety. The next time Witt allegedly followed the woman, Deerfield officers followed him

When officers pulled him over, they found a camera and asked him what he was using it for.

“Something I should not have been doing,” he allegedly told the officer.

But did the woman have any expectation of privacy as they were walking to their cars in the public parking lots.

Of course they did not.

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