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When photography and videography is illegal

As much as we like to argue that photography is completely legal in the public realm, there are some exceptions.

And that especially goes for shooting photos up the skirts of women – a trend that seems to happening with much more regularity.

If fact, if you Google the term &#82


As much as we like to argue that photography is completely legal in the public realm, there are some exceptions.

And that especially goes for shooting photos up the skirts of women – a trend that seems to happening with much more regularity.

If fact, if you Google the term “upskirt,” you will come across loads of explicit sites dedicated to photos and videos shot up the skirts of women. Most seem consensual and are just another genre of porn, but a few appear to focus on unsuspecting women in public.

This week, Martin Matthew Hemby, a 20-year-old San Antonio man, was arrested for the second time in two weeks for taking photos up the skirts of women at the same Walmart.

Last month, Matthew Navaie, a 22-year-old man from Oregon was arrested after doing the same thing to a woman in a Target.

Navaie was caught on a surveillance video which you can see above. When police searched Navaie’s home computer, they allegedly found child pornography, so his life is pretty much over.

Also last month, David Delagrange, a 40-year-old man from Indiana, was arrested after allegedly building an elaborate camera system that went from inside his pants to his right shoe, where he would walk around a shopping mall and stick his foot underneath the dresses of unsuspecting females, including an underage girl.

And earlier this year, Brandon Gilroy – a 23-year-old police officer from Texas – was arrested after he was caught sticking his camera underneath a dressing room stall at an Austin Macy’s.

It doesn’t take an Einstein to know that these women had an expectation of privacy regarding certain areas of their bodies.

In fact, the federal Video Voyeurism Prevention Act, passed in 2004, was designed to address instances where people are photographed or videotaped in a sexual manner without their consent in instances where they had a clear expectation of privacy.

This wouldn’t apply to the case of the two 15-year-old girls who were flashing their breasts to passing motorists in Florida because they were intentionally drawing attention to their naked breasts.

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