Home / PINAC News / Miami-Dade cop exposes abuse within his own department
From my experience, every time a police officer turns on his fellow officers to report abuse, he becomes ostracized and eventually forced out of the department. Hopefully that won’t happen to Miami-Dade Police Officer Frank Adams, who sat with the Miami New Times and described how hi

Miami-Dade cop exposes abuse within his own department


From my experience, every time a police officer turns on his fellow officers to report abuse, he becomes ostracized and eventually forced out of the department.

Hopefully that won’t happen to Miami-Dade Police Officer Frank Adams, who sat with the Miami New Times and described how his fellow officers routinely abuse and falsely arrest citizens.

Adams, a 15-year veteran, deserves to be commended for his righteousness and bravery for speaking out.

Miami-Dade Police officer Frank Adams calls it the “Rodney King beatdown.” When the burly, soft-spoken 15-year department veteran watched four fellow cops kick, choke, and punch an unarmed subject eight years ago, he says, it was every bit as vicious as the infamous Los Angeles incident. The only difference: There wasn’t a video camera to catch it.

“I thought he was dead,” Adams says of 42-year-old Henry Lee Gaines, who was arrested around 4 a.m. September 22, 2002, in front of his tiny banana-colored Brownsville home. “I saw him go into convulsions and thought, Oh my God, they killed this guy.”

But what really floored Adams is the way Officer Gregorio Perez, who wrote the report, spun the incident. Five-foot-nine-inch Gaines was described as an incredibly powerful aggressor. He had allegedly lifted one officer onto his shoulder, climbed a set of stairs, and hurled the cop to the ground. He had supposedly even grabbed Adams by the shirt and repeatedly punched him, knocking him to the ground and injuring his hand.

It’s a lie, Adams says. He claims Gaines never resisted: The hand injury had occurred when another cop knocked Adams over while trying to kick Gaines. No criminal charges have been filed, but the claim was validated last month by the department’s Professional Compliance Bureau (PCB).


About Carlos Miller

Carlos Miller is founder and publisher of Photography is Not a Crime, which began as a one-man blog in 2007 to document his trial after he was arrested for photographing police during a journalistic assignment. He is also the author of The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which can be purchased through Amazon.

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