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Police Arrest Journalists and Random Photographer at Fort Benning Protests

A televison crew was arrested while documenting police arresting protesters outside the Fort Benning military base in Georgia, which hosts the infamous School of the Americas.

The new crew were from RT, formerly Russia Today, which regularly covers activism activity within the United States, including interviewing me a few months ago for my thoughts on the Anthony Graber case.

Reporter Kaelyn Forde, her cameraman Jon Conway and possibly a third member of the crew ended up detained for 32 hours with about 20 other protesters.

They were charged with insubordination to the authorities, taking part in unlawful assembly and failure to disperse – or to put it more accurately, contempt-of-cop while exercising their First Amendment rights.

Police also arrested a man who happened to walk out of a barber shop and began taking photos.

After 24 hours of incarceration, the journalists were brought before a judge who spent six hours trying to sort through the details, only to inform them that they could plead guilty to unlawful assembly and pay a fine or go back to jail.

They opted to pay the fine.

The protests have been taking place every November in Columbus since 1990, a year after six Jesuit priests were murdered in El Salvador by soldiers who had been trained at the academy.

This year’s protest drew less than 5,000 people, even though they were drawing more than 17,000 up until a few years ago.

After years of questionable human rights violations by graduates in several Latin American countries, the School of Americas was renamed to the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation.

 

A televison crew was arrested while documenting police arresting protesters outside the Fort Benning military base in Georgia, which hosts the infamous School of the Americas.

The new crew were from RT, formerly Russia Today, which regularly covers activism activity within the United States, including interviewing me a few months ago for my thoughts on the Anthony Graber case.

Reporter Kaelyn Forde, her cameraman Jon Conway and possibly a third member of the crew ended up detained for 32 hours with about 20 other protesters.

They were charged with insubordination to the authorities, taking part in unlawful assembly and failure to disperse – or to put it more accurately, contempt-of-cop while exercising their First Amendment rights.

Police also arrested a man who happened to walk out of a barber shop and began taking photos.

After 24 hours of incarceration, the journalists were brought before a judge who spent six hours trying to sort through the details, only to inform them that they could plead guilty to unlawful assembly and pay a fine or go back to jail.

They opted to pay the fine.

The protests have been taking place every November in Columbus since 1990, a year after six Jesuit priests were murdered in El Salvador by soldiers who had been trained at the academy.

This year’s protest drew less than 5,000 people, even though they were drawing more than 17,000 up until a few years ago.

After years of questionable human rights violations by graduates in several Latin American countries, the School of Americas was renamed to the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation.

 

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