Illinois Man Files Suit Against "Abnormal" State Wiretapping Law - PINAC News
Connect
To Top

Illinois Man Files Suit Against "Abnormal" State Wiretapping Law

An Illinois man who was arrested last year on felony wiretapping charges after he videotaped a traffic stop has filed a lawsuit, questioning the Constitutionality of the state’s law.

As many of us know, Illinois has the most absurd wiretapping law in the nation, making it illegal to audio record police in public, but giving them the right to record citizens.

The lawsuit, filed by Louis Frobe last Friday, calls the law “abnormal.”

According to the lawsuit, Frobe is a disabled 47-year-old man who takes a multitude of medications.

He was pulled over one night for allegedly speeding. He started recording the interaction because he had prior negative experience with the police in the village of Lindenhurst.

He was then arrested on wiretapping charges as well as possession of controlled substances, even though he had copies of his prescriptions on the front seat of his car.

Both charges were eventually dropped.

The lawsuit seeks to change the Illinois law because it puts a chill on our Constitutional right to record police in public.

An Illinois man who was arrested last year on felony wiretapping charges after he videotaped a traffic stop has filed a lawsuit, questioning the Constitutionality of the state’s law.

As many of us know, Illinois has the most absurd wiretapping law in the nation, making it illegal to audio record police in public, but giving them the right to record citizens.

The lawsuit, filed by Louis Frobe last Friday, calls the law “abnormal.”

According to the lawsuit, Frobe is a disabled 47-year-old man who takes a multitude of medications.

He was pulled over one night for allegedly speeding. He started recording the interaction because he had prior negative experience with the police in the village of Lindenhurst.

He was then arrested on wiretapping charges as well as possession of controlled substances, even though he had copies of his prescriptions on the front seat of his car.

Both charges were eventually dropped.

The lawsuit seeks to change the Illinois law because it puts a chill on our Constitutional right to record police in public.

More in PINAC News