Activist Arrested For Videotaping Inside New Hampshire Courthouse - PINAC News
Connect
To Top

Activist Arrested For Videotaping Inside New Hampshire Courthouse

Court officials in New Hampshire first claimed it was a federal violation to videotape them inside the city courthouse.

But they could only come up with a measly disorderly conduct charge when they arrested an activist Tuesday who continued to videotape them against their wishes.

The arrest is part of the ongoing drama between a group of activists who call themselves the Free State Project and local authorities in Keene, a city of just over 23,000.

The goal of the Free State Project is to double Keene’s population by bringing in more than 20,000 libertarian-leaning people and therefore turning New Hampshire into a libertarian stronghold.

The activists spend a great deal of time testing out the system and being a thorn in the side to Judge Edward Burke.

The latest incident began Tuesday morning when Burke had Adam “Ademo Freeman” Mueller arrested for “improper influence,” a felony, after Mueller was apparently questioning him about the arrest of another activist for failing to remove his hat in court.

You may remember Mueller as part of Liberty on Tour who got a first-hand taste of overbearing Metrorail security guards during his visit to Miami last October.

He was also arrested for contempt of court in Keene earlier this year.

So after he was arrested on Tuesday, activists Jason Repsher and Derrick Horton visited the Keene District Courthouse to inquire about his arrest.

Repsher entered first with the camera and was told he was committing a federal crime by continuing to videotape the public officials against their will.

It is actually legal to videotape inside the courtrooms in New Hampshire and there doesn’t appear to be a law stating that it is illegal to videotape outside the courtrooms.

But the man, who appeared to be a bailiff because of a badge on his chest, gave him two minutes to shut it off.

Horton then apparently grabbed the same camera and continued videotaping, inquiring which is the policy that forbids him from doing so.

The bailiff pointed to something posted on a wall but before Horton could videotape it, he was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct and released that same afternoon.

So much for that federal violation.

Court officials in New Hampshire first claimed it was a federal violation to videotape them inside the city courthouse.

But they could only come up with a measly disorderly conduct charge when they arrested an activist Tuesday who continued to videotape them against their wishes.

The arrest is part of the ongoing drama between a group of activists who call themselves the Free State Project and local authorities in Keene, a city of just over 23,000.

The goal of the Free State Project is to double Keene’s population by bringing in more than 20,000 libertarian-leaning people and therefore turning New Hampshire into a libertarian stronghold.

The activists spend a great deal of time testing out the system and being a thorn in the side to Judge Edward Burke.

The latest incident began Tuesday morning when Burke had Adam “Ademo Freeman” Mueller arrested for “improper influence,” a felony, after Mueller was apparently questioning him about the arrest of another activist for failing to remove his hat in court.

You may remember Mueller as part of Liberty on Tour who got a first-hand taste of overbearing Metrorail security guards during his visit to Miami last October.

He was also arrested for contempt of court in Keene earlier this year.

So after he was arrested on Tuesday, activists Jason Repsher and Derrick Horton visited the Keene District Courthouse to inquire about his arrest.

Repsher entered first with the camera and was told he was committing a federal crime by continuing to videotape the public officials against their will.

It is actually legal to videotape inside the courtrooms in New Hampshire and there doesn’t appear to be a law stating that it is illegal to videotape outside the courtrooms.

But the man, who appeared to be a bailiff because of a badge on his chest, gave him two minutes to shut it off.

Horton then apparently grabbed the same camera and continued videotaping, inquiring which is the policy that forbids him from doing so.

The bailiff pointed to something posted on a wall but before Horton could videotape it, he was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct and released that same afternoon.

So much for that federal violation.

More in PINAC News