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Oregon Man Ordered Not To Take Pictures Outside Courthouse

An Oregon man was told he was not allowed to photograph prospective jurors walking out of a courthouse, even though he was standing on a public sidewalk when doing so.

Phil Logan-Kelly was standing outside the Coos County Courthouse Wednesday, snapping photos of the potential jurors during a break in the jury selection of a high profile murder trial.

He was immediately confronted by deputies who demanded to know what he was doing.

He repeatedly asked if he was being detained and they said no, so he walked back to his car.

However, they followed him and took note of his license plate number.

Later that day, a deputy knocked on his door, informing him that the judge in the case was forbidding him from taking photos from outside the courthouse.

Logan-Kelly refused to open the door, opting to communicate through the closed door.

“He told me through that Coos County Circuit Court Judge Richard Barron orders me to not take pictures in front of the courthouse or be in contempt,” Logan-Kelly wrote in an email to Photography is Not a Crime.

“I asked him if he had a warrant and when he said no, I wouldn’t let him in my door.  He didn’t like talking through it.  He had some kind of paper in his hand but I couldn’t see what it was.”

The deputy did not attempt to slide the paper under the door or leave it in his mailbox.

A local TV station, KCBY, interviewed the Coos County District Attorney, who told them Logan-Kelly reacted angrily to the deputies.

“There was an individual that decided that he wanted to photograph the jurors, which is strictly prohibited.” Frasier said law enforcement approached the man and told him to stop taking pictures, but he reacted angrily.

“You cannot photograph jurors. Period. And he’s been told that. I don’t know if he got the message: don’t do it,” Frasier said. “Because he will get prosecuted if he does.”

I’m not sure if Frasier watched the video or depended solely on the deputies’ version of the story, but I wouldn’t exactly call Logan-Kelly’s responses angry.

I wrote about Logan-Kelly back in October when he had another run-in with police over his photography.

An Oregon man was told he was not allowed to photograph prospective jurors walking out of a courthouse, even though he was standing on a public sidewalk when doing so.

Phil Logan-Kelly was standing outside the Coos County Courthouse Wednesday, snapping photos of the potential jurors during a break in the jury selection of a high profile murder trial.

He was immediately confronted by deputies who demanded to know what he was doing.

He repeatedly asked if he was being detained and they said no, so he walked back to his car.

However, they followed him and took note of his license plate number.

Later that day, a deputy knocked on his door, informing him that the judge in the case was forbidding him from taking photos from outside the courthouse.

Logan-Kelly refused to open the door, opting to communicate through the closed door.

“He told me through that Coos County Circuit Court Judge Richard Barron orders me to not take pictures in front of the courthouse or be in contempt,” Logan-Kelly wrote in an email to Photography is Not a Crime.

“I asked him if he had a warrant and when he said no, I wouldn’t let him in my door.  He didn’t like talking through it.  He had some kind of paper in his hand but I couldn’t see what it was.”

The deputy did not attempt to slide the paper under the door or leave it in his mailbox.

A local TV station, KCBY, interviewed the Coos County District Attorney, who told them Logan-Kelly reacted angrily to the deputies.

“There was an individual that decided that he wanted to photograph the jurors, which is strictly prohibited.” Frasier said law enforcement approached the man and told him to stop taking pictures, but he reacted angrily.

“You cannot photograph jurors. Period. And he’s been told that. I don’t know if he got the message: don’t do it,” Frasier said. “Because he will get prosecuted if he does.”

I’m not sure if Frasier watched the video or depended solely on the deputies’ version of the story, but I wouldn’t exactly call Logan-Kelly’s responses angry.

I wrote about Logan-Kelly back in October when he had another run-in with police over his photography.

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