Man Attacks Girlfriend Before Recording Cops; Charged With Wiretapping - PINAC News
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Man Attacks Girlfriend Before Recording Cops; Charged With Wiretapping

By all accounts, Fidelito Lledin of Boston is not somebody you want to piss off.

In February, when his neighbor who owed him money knocked on his door to explain some type of payment plan, Lledin pulled out a pocketknife and told him he would “take your head off.”

But then he dropped the knife and retrieved an aluminum baseball bat from his room and began swinging it at the neighbor, connecting at least once to the back of the head.

 The neighbor grabbed the bat and ran to call police. Later that day, it is not clear if he was jailed, he knocked on his neighbor’s door and demanded his bat back.

When he’s not attacking his neighbor, he takes out his anger on his girlfriend. At least twice this year, including one time earlier this year and one time last month.

During last month’s incident, police arrived on the scene and found his girlfriend lying on the ground with a shattered beer bottle nearby. The girlfriend said police he had hit here.

So police handcuffed him and threw him in the back of the squad car.

Once in the cruiser, officers discovered Lledin was using the phone to video them, Dorchester District Court Judge Kenneth Desmond heard. When they told him to stop, he refused, so in addition to booking Lledin for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, they added a charge of wiretapping, under a state law that makes it illegal to make an audio recording of people without their consent.

Well, actually Massachusetts state law says it is illegal to secretly audio record people without their consent, but that has not stopped cops from using it against people who videotape in public.

So now Lledin is facing the following sentence for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon:

(b) Whoever commits an assault and battery upon another by means of a dangerous weapon shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for not more than 10 years or in the house of correction for not more than 2½ years, or by a fine of not more than $5,000, or by both such fine and imprisonment.

And he is facing this sentence for the wiretapping charge:

(A person who) willfully commits an interception, attempts to commit an interception, or procures any other person to commit an interception or to attempt to commit an interception of any wire or oral communication shall be fined not more than ten thousand dollars, or imprisoned in the state prison for not more than five years, or imprisoned in a jail or house of correction for not more than two and one half years, or both so fined and given one such imprisonment.

Had he only assaulted those people without a dangerous weapon, he would get off with much lighter sentence than the wiretapping.

Section 13A. (a) Whoever commits an assault or an assault and battery upon another shall be punished by imprisonment for not more than 2½ years in a house of correction or by a fine of not more than $1,000.

After all, police are continually learning that a camera can be more devastating to their careers than a gun.

By all accounts, Fidelito Lledin of Boston is not somebody you want to piss off.

In February, when his neighbor who owed him money knocked on his door to explain some type of payment plan, Lledin pulled out a pocketknife and told him he would “take your head off.”

But then he dropped the knife and retrieved an aluminum baseball bat from his room and began swinging it at the neighbor, connecting at least once to the back of the head.

 The neighbor grabbed the bat and ran to call police. Later that day, it is not clear if he was jailed, he knocked on his neighbor’s door and demanded his bat back.

When he’s not attacking his neighbor, he takes out his anger on his girlfriend. At least twice this year, including one time earlier this year and one time last month.

During last month’s incident, police arrived on the scene and found his girlfriend lying on the ground with a shattered beer bottle nearby. The girlfriend said police he had hit here.

So police handcuffed him and threw him in the back of the squad car.

Once in the cruiser, officers discovered Lledin was using the phone to video them, Dorchester District Court Judge Kenneth Desmond heard. When they told him to stop, he refused, so in addition to booking Lledin for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, they added a charge of wiretapping, under a state law that makes it illegal to make an audio recording of people without their consent.

Well, actually Massachusetts state law says it is illegal to secretly audio record people without their consent, but that has not stopped cops from using it against people who videotape in public.

So now Lledin is facing the following sentence for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon:

(b) Whoever commits an assault and battery upon another by means of a dangerous weapon shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for not more than 10 years or in the house of correction for not more than 2½ years, or by a fine of not more than $5,000, or by both such fine and imprisonment.

And he is facing this sentence for the wiretapping charge:

(A person who) willfully commits an interception, attempts to commit an interception, or procures any other person to commit an interception or to attempt to commit an interception of any wire or oral communication shall be fined not more than ten thousand dollars, or imprisoned in the state prison for not more than five years, or imprisoned in a jail or house of correction for not more than two and one half years, or both so fined and given one such imprisonment.

Had he only assaulted those people without a dangerous weapon, he would get off with much lighter sentence than the wiretapping.

Section 13A. (a) Whoever commits an assault or an assault and battery upon another shall be punished by imprisonment for not more than 2½ years in a house of correction or by a fine of not more than $1,000.

After all, police are continually learning that a camera can be more devastating to their careers than a gun.

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