Journalist Uses Flip Camera To Document Own Arrest - PINAC News
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Journalist Uses Flip Camera To Document Own Arrest

A reporter for the Nashville Scene was interviewing protesters with a Flip camera when he was caught up in a mass arrest at an Occupy Nashville protest.

The protesters were standing in front of Legislative Plaza where they had been camped out for three weeks.

Jonathan Meador can be heard identifying himself as a journalist, but the cop handcuffed him anyway.

One cop can be heard telling another cop to book him for “resisting arrest.”

Meador ended up being booked on public intoxication, which was never part of the conversation during the arrest.

And he comes across extremely sober while interviewing the protesters before his arrest.

The video reminds me of my second arrest for taking photos of cops in which I was initially charged with disorderly intoxication, a charge that was later changed to resisting arrest, which I ended up beating in court when the cop didn’t show up.

I describe that arrest here (scroll down to middle of story):

They charged me with disorderly intoxication, which requires a suspect to be carrying a drink in public as well as causing a public disturbance. I was not carrying any booze and asking a cop for his name is hardly creating a public disturbance. And neither is taking his picture for that matter.

I ended up spending the night in jail with a bunch of other guys arrested on baseless charges on Miami Beach.

Meador was among 25 people arrested that night whose charges were quickly dropped by a night court judge who took the time to research the law.

“I have reviewed the regulations of the state of Tennessee, and I can find no authority anywhere for anyone to authorize a curfew anywhere on Legislative Plaza,” Judge Nelson told a grimacing trooper, before ordering the immediate release of everyone arrested.

A reporter for the Nashville Scene was interviewing protesters with a Flip camera when he was caught up in a mass arrest at an Occupy Nashville protest.

The protesters were standing in front of Legislative Plaza where they had been camped out for three weeks.

Jonathan Meador can be heard identifying himself as a journalist, but the cop handcuffed him anyway.

One cop can be heard telling another cop to book him for “resisting arrest.”

Meador ended up being booked on public intoxication, which was never part of the conversation during the arrest.

And he comes across extremely sober while interviewing the protesters before his arrest.

The video reminds me of my second arrest for taking photos of cops in which I was initially charged with disorderly intoxication, a charge that was later changed to resisting arrest, which I ended up beating in court when the cop didn’t show up.

I describe that arrest here (scroll down to middle of story):

They charged me with disorderly intoxication, which requires a suspect to be carrying a drink in public as well as causing a public disturbance. I was not carrying any booze and asking a cop for his name is hardly creating a public disturbance. And neither is taking his picture for that matter.

I ended up spending the night in jail with a bunch of other guys arrested on baseless charges on Miami Beach.

Meador was among 25 people arrested that night whose charges were quickly dropped by a night court judge who took the time to research the law.

“I have reviewed the regulations of the state of Tennessee, and I can find no authority anywhere for anyone to authorize a curfew anywhere on Legislative Plaza,” Judge Nelson told a grimacing trooper, before ordering the immediate release of everyone arrested.

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