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Federal Security Guard And Cop Harass Man For Video Recording Courthouse

A Tucson man was harassed and threatened by a federal security guard as well as a police officer because he was standing outside a courthouse with a video camera.

The videographer is a member of Cop Block so he knows his rights and the law.

Unfortunately, the men paid to enforce the law had no clue.

The guard started off by telling him he was not allowed to video record the courthouse, then ordering him to leave.

When the videographer stood his ground, the guard walked off to call police.

A Tucson police officer on a bike pulled up, telling him he had to walk across the street to continue recording.

The videographer reminded him that he was already standing on a public sidewalk, so it didn’t make a difference what side of the street he was standing on.

It is not clear how the incident ended but it is clear the videographer proved his point.

Last year, I had a similar incident in front of a federal courthouse in Miami. Another man had a similar incident in Ohio earlier this year.

Perhaps next time the Tucson videographer should carry a printout of last year’s settlement that declared it is legal to photograph or video record federal buildings.

Perhaps Tucson activists need to occupy the public sidewalk in front of the courthouse with their cameras to remind officials of the law.


Please send stories and tips to carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com

 

A Tucson man was harassed and threatened by a federal security guard as well as a police officer because he was standing outside a courthouse with a video camera.

The videographer is a member of Cop Block so he knows his rights and the law.

Unfortunately, the men paid to enforce the law had no clue.

The guard started off by telling him he was not allowed to video record the courthouse, then ordering him to leave.

When the videographer stood his ground, the guard walked off to call police.

A Tucson police officer on a bike pulled up, telling him he had to walk across the street to continue recording.

The videographer reminded him that he was already standing on a public sidewalk, so it didn’t make a difference what side of the street he was standing on.

It is not clear how the incident ended but it is clear the videographer proved his point.

Last year, I had a similar incident in front of a federal courthouse in Miami. Another man had a similar incident in Ohio earlier this year.

Perhaps next time the Tucson videographer should carry a printout of last year’s settlement that declared it is legal to photograph or video record federal buildings.

Perhaps Tucson activists need to occupy the public sidewalk in front of the courthouse with their cameras to remind officials of the law.


Please send stories and tips to carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com

 

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