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Senator Bill Nelson's Intern Threatens To Sue Me For Video Recording Him

I was going to hold off in posting this until I edited the whole video and finished writing the story for Miami Beach 411, but Senator Bill Nelson’s intern is probably checking my site to see if he needs to proceed with his lawsuit.

He’s not really clear on what law I violated, but he’s pretty sure there’s one out there.

I had accompanied a group of Occupy Miami activists Monday to Nelson’s office because they were hoping to persuade the democratic senator to vote against the controversial Senate Bill 1867, which is being protested by the ACLU:

The Senate is going to vote on whether Congress will give this president—and every future president — the power to order the military to pick up and imprison without charge or trial civilians anywhere in the world. Even Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) raised his concerns about the NDAA detention provisions during last night’s Republican debate. The power is so broad that even U.S. citizens could be swept up by the military and the military could be used far from any battlefield, even within the United States itself.

Nelson wasn’t there, so we hung around inside his office for a few minutes in the hopes his employees would relay him the message.

The intern got a little agitated that I was recording, so he grabbed my arm. I pulled away and warned that I would call the cops if he continued. He tried grabbing my arm again, but I moved it so he wouldn’t touch the camera.

I’m not really one to call the cops on people, but I find threatening to call the cops on people is more effective than slapping their hand away. Maybe I’m mellowing in my older age.

Then we went to the office of Senator Marco Rubio, a republican, and I was ordered by his represenative to leave if I did not stop recording. The cops were already on hand waiting for us, so they told me to leave and I did.

They were cordial about it and even confirmed my right to video record in the hallway outside the office when a janitor told me I was not allowed.

And I really didn’t want to make this about me when it was really about the insane legislation that the senate is about to vote on.

The activists ended up sitting behind closed doors with the represenative and I could have joined them if it wasn’t for my crazy need to actually document the meeting.


Please send stories, tips and videos to carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com

I was going to hold off in posting this until I edited the whole video and finished writing the story for Miami Beach 411, but Senator Bill Nelson’s intern is probably checking my site to see if he needs to proceed with his lawsuit.

He’s not really clear on what law I violated, but he’s pretty sure there’s one out there.

I had accompanied a group of Occupy Miami activists Monday to Nelson’s office because they were hoping to persuade the democratic senator to vote against the controversial Senate Bill 1867, which is being protested by the ACLU:

The Senate is going to vote on whether Congress will give this president—and every future president — the power to order the military to pick up and imprison without charge or trial civilians anywhere in the world. Even Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) raised his concerns about the NDAA detention provisions during last night’s Republican debate. The power is so broad that even U.S. citizens could be swept up by the military and the military could be used far from any battlefield, even within the United States itself.

Nelson wasn’t there, so we hung around inside his office for a few minutes in the hopes his employees would relay him the message.

The intern got a little agitated that I was recording, so he grabbed my arm. I pulled away and warned that I would call the cops if he continued. He tried grabbing my arm again, but I moved it so he wouldn’t touch the camera.

I’m not really one to call the cops on people, but I find threatening to call the cops on people is more effective than slapping their hand away. Maybe I’m mellowing in my older age.

Then we went to the office of Senator Marco Rubio, a republican, and I was ordered by his represenative to leave if I did not stop recording. The cops were already on hand waiting for us, so they told me to leave and I did.

They were cordial about it and even confirmed my right to video record in the hallway outside the office when a janitor told me I was not allowed.

And I really didn’t want to make this about me when it was really about the insane legislation that the senate is about to vote on.

The activists ended up sitting behind closed doors with the represenative and I could have joined them if it wasn’t for my crazy need to actually document the meeting.


Please send stories, tips and videos to carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com

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