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Iowa Man Convicted In Videotaping Case Needs To File Appeal

An Iowa man who was video recording a traffic stop from his front yard was convicted of interfering with an investigation.

Justin Norman, 28, now faces up to 30 days in jail.

Hopefully, he’ll appeal the case because the above video shows he was hardly interfering.

Unfortunately, the Des Moines Register refused to post or link to the video in its story.

Norman was a passenger in Kirk Brown’s car when police pulled them over for having an open trunk in July.

The 12-minute video shows Brown having an attitude with the cops, aka contempt of cop, which probably led to the officers arresting Norman.

And it probably helped the prosecutor convince the jury that Norman was anti-cop and deserved to be arrested, even though from a legal standpoint, he was not breaking the law.

Iowa law defines interference as someone who “resists” or “obstructs” and makes it clear that this does not include “verbal harassment.”

719.1  Interference with official acts.

1.  A person who knowingly resists or obstructs anyone known by the person to be a peace officer, emergency medical care provider under chapter 147A, or fire fighter, whether paid or volunteer, in the performance of any act which is within the scope of the lawful duty or authority of that officer, emergency medical care provider under chapter 147A, or fire fighter, whether paid or volunteer, or who knowingly resists or obstructs the service or execution by any authorized person of any civil or criminal process or order of any court, commits a serious misdemeanor. However, if a person commits an interference with official acts, as defined in this subsection, and in so doing inflicts bodily injury other than serious injury, that person commits an aggravated misdemeanor. If a person commits an interference with official acts, as defined in this subsection, and in so doing inflicts or attempts to inflict serious injury, or displays a dangerous weapon, as defined in section 702.7, or is armed with a firearm, that person commits a class “D” felony.

2.  A person under the custody, control, or supervision of the department of corrections who knowingly resists, obstructs, or interferes with a correctional officer, agent, employee, or contractor, whether paid or volunteer, in the performance of the person’s official duties, commits a serious misdemeanor. If a person violates this subsection and in so doing commits an assault, as defined in section 708.1, the person commits an aggravated misdemeanor. If a person violates this subsection and in so doing inflicts or attempts to inflict bodily injury other than serious injury to another, displays a dangerous weapon, as defined in section 702.7, or is armed with a firearm, the person commits a class “D” felony. If a person violates this subsection and uses or attempts to use a dangerous weapon, as defined in section 702.7, or inflicts serious injury to another, the person commits a class “C” felony.

3.  The terms “resist” and “obstruct”, as used in this section, do not include verbal harassment unless the verbal harassment is accompanied by a present ability and apparent intention to execute a verbal threat physically.

This reminds me of my experience where a jury found me guilty of resisting arrest, even though the evidence did not support this.

I appealed my case and had the conviction reversed. Hopefully, Norman will do the same.

An Iowa man who was video recording a traffic stop from his front yard was convicted of interfering with an investigation.

Justin Norman, 28, now faces up to 30 days in jail.

Hopefully, he’ll appeal the case because the above video shows he was hardly interfering.

Unfortunately, the Des Moines Register refused to post or link to the video in its story.

Norman was a passenger in Kirk Brown’s car when police pulled them over for having an open trunk in July.

The 12-minute video shows Brown having an attitude with the cops, aka contempt of cop, which probably led to the officers arresting Norman.

And it probably helped the prosecutor convince the jury that Norman was anti-cop and deserved to be arrested, even though from a legal standpoint, he was not breaking the law.

Iowa law defines interference as someone who “resists” or “obstructs” and makes it clear that this does not include “verbal harassment.”

719.1  Interference with official acts.

1.  A person who knowingly resists or obstructs anyone known by the person to be a peace officer, emergency medical care provider under chapter 147A, or fire fighter, whether paid or volunteer, in the performance of any act which is within the scope of the lawful duty or authority of that officer, emergency medical care provider under chapter 147A, or fire fighter, whether paid or volunteer, or who knowingly resists or obstructs the service or execution by any authorized person of any civil or criminal process or order of any court, commits a serious misdemeanor. However, if a person commits an interference with official acts, as defined in this subsection, and in so doing inflicts bodily injury other than serious injury, that person commits an aggravated misdemeanor. If a person commits an interference with official acts, as defined in this subsection, and in so doing inflicts or attempts to inflict serious injury, or displays a dangerous weapon, as defined in section 702.7, or is armed with a firearm, that person commits a class “D” felony.

2.  A person under the custody, control, or supervision of the department of corrections who knowingly resists, obstructs, or interferes with a correctional officer, agent, employee, or contractor, whether paid or volunteer, in the performance of the person’s official duties, commits a serious misdemeanor. If a person violates this subsection and in so doing commits an assault, as defined in section 708.1, the person commits an aggravated misdemeanor. If a person violates this subsection and in so doing inflicts or attempts to inflict bodily injury other than serious injury to another, displays a dangerous weapon, as defined in section 702.7, or is armed with a firearm, the person commits a class “D” felony. If a person violates this subsection and uses or attempts to use a dangerous weapon, as defined in section 702.7, or inflicts serious injury to another, the person commits a class “C” felony.

3.  The terms “resist” and “obstruct”, as used in this section, do not include verbal harassment unless the verbal harassment is accompanied by a present ability and apparent intention to execute a verbal threat physically.

This reminds me of my experience where a jury found me guilty of resisting arrest, even though the evidence did not support this.

I appealed my case and had the conviction reversed. Hopefully, Norman will do the same.

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