MTA Conductor Reports Man For Legally Recording On Subway Platform - PINAC News
Connect
To Top

MTA Conductor Reports Man For Legally Recording On Subway Platform

Despite it being legal to video record within New York City’s train system, a Metropolitan Transportation Authority conductor told a man he was not allowed to do so.

The videographer is named Raymond Ging, who has a whole series of train videos on his Youtube channel.

When he continued recording an incoming train from a platform in Queens, the MTA conductor reported him to the Rail Control Center, which serves as a dispatch for the subway system.

“RCC, be advised you have an individual here at 103rd Street northbound, he’s videotaping the whole line, he’s currently videotaping me, he’s approximately six-feet tall, black shirt, blue jeans, black sneakers, green army bag over his shoulders.”

The conductor then pulled his train out of the station without another word to the videographer, who remained silent the whole time.

Section 1050.9 (c) of the MTA Rules of Conduct state that photography is allowed under certain conditions, which seemed to have all been met by Ging.

Photography, filming or video recording in any facility or conveyance is permitted except that ancillary equipment such as lights, reflectors or tripods may not be used. Members of the press holding valid identification issued by the New York City Police Department are hereby authorized to use necessary ancillary equipment. All photographic activity must be conducted in accordance with the provisions of this Part.

In 2009, an MTA worker who also happens to be a photographer was arrested by an NYPD officer for taking pictures of trains.

Robert Taylor, who was charged with unauthorized photography, ended up winning $30,000 in a lawsuit because of the arrest.


Please send stories, tips and videos to carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com.

CARLOS MILLER’S LEGAL DEFENSE FUND

I am immersed in a legal case where I not only want to clear my criminal charges stemming from my arrest in January, but I want to sue the Miami-Dade Police Department for deleting my footage, which I was able to recover.

My goal is to set some type of precedent to ensure this does not happen as often as it does today where cops simply get away with it.

So if you would like to contribute, please click on the “donate” button below and contribute whatever you can afford.

You can also contribute to my Legal Defense Fund by purchasing a photographer rights lens cloth and/or laminated card to wear around your neck like a press badge through Zap Rag.Please write “carlos3” in the comments section of the Paypal transaction to ensure I receive a portion of the sale.

Despite it being legal to video record within New York City’s train system, a Metropolitan Transportation Authority conductor told a man he was not allowed to do so.

The videographer is named Raymond Ging, who has a whole series of train videos on his Youtube channel.

When he continued recording an incoming train from a platform in Queens, the MTA conductor reported him to the Rail Control Center, which serves as a dispatch for the subway system.

“RCC, be advised you have an individual here at 103rd Street northbound, he’s videotaping the whole line, he’s currently videotaping me, he’s approximately six-feet tall, black shirt, blue jeans, black sneakers, green army bag over his shoulders.”

The conductor then pulled his train out of the station without another word to the videographer, who remained silent the whole time.

Section 1050.9 (c) of the MTA Rules of Conduct state that photography is allowed under certain conditions, which seemed to have all been met by Ging.

Photography, filming or video recording in any facility or conveyance is permitted except that ancillary equipment such as lights, reflectors or tripods may not be used. Members of the press holding valid identification issued by the New York City Police Department are hereby authorized to use necessary ancillary equipment. All photographic activity must be conducted in accordance with the provisions of this Part.

In 2009, an MTA worker who also happens to be a photographer was arrested by an NYPD officer for taking pictures of trains.

Robert Taylor, who was charged with unauthorized photography, ended up winning $30,000 in a lawsuit because of the arrest.


Please send stories, tips and videos to carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com.

CARLOS MILLER’S LEGAL DEFENSE FUND

I am immersed in a legal case where I not only want to clear my criminal charges stemming from my arrest in January, but I want to sue the Miami-Dade Police Department for deleting my footage, which I was able to recover.

My goal is to set some type of precedent to ensure this does not happen as often as it does today where cops simply get away with it.

So if you would like to contribute, please click on the “donate” button below and contribute whatever you can afford.

You can also contribute to my Legal Defense Fund by purchasing a photographer rights lens cloth and/or laminated card to wear around your neck like a press badge through Zap Rag.Please write “carlos3” in the comments section of the Paypal transaction to ensure I receive a portion of the sale.

More in