Home / Milwaukee Cops Detain, Cuff and Cite Man for Recording Them in Public

A Milwaukee man was handcuffed and detained, then cited for loitering after video recording police on a public sidewalk.

Tim Seltz had been hanging inside a nightclub called Suite earlier this month when he stepped outside to smoke a cigarette.

He came across a group of police officers, some on horseback, some on motorcycles,  some on bicycles, some just milling about.

He pulled out his Flip cam and started recording.

“Go home,” one cop told him.

“You gotta get out of here with that camera,” another cop said.

He started asserting his right to record, which prompted them to start shining their lights in his face and pushing him away.

Meanwhile, a multitude of other citizens were allowed to congregate in the area without getting ordered away.

But they didn’t have cameras.

He continues recording until another cop walks up to him shining the light in his face, saying, “you can’t stand here and do this.”

At 3:20, a cop on horseback starts moving towards him with his flashlight in his face, ordering him to “keep walking.”

About a minute or so later, cops respond to some type of altercation between a couple of men, so Seltz follows them and continues recording.

While a group of officers stand around one of the men asking him question, Seltz stands a few feet behind them with his camera.

One of the cops orders him to move 20 feet away while permitting several other citizens without cameras to remain in the area.

But Seltz abides by the cop’s orders, walking backwards until he is standing in front of Suite again. The club he just spent $60 on drinks where he was celebrating his girlfriend’s 31st birthday.

That is when he comes across some jackass bouncer named Neil who accuses him of loitering for standing on the public sidewalk in front of the club.

Neil claims the club owns the sidewalk, which is complete “bullshit” as Seltz tells him. Nevertheless, Seltz begins to walk away under his girlfriend’s insistence.

But he didn’t get far because a cop grabbed him and handcuffed him.

Seltz was ordered to sit on a sidewalk for 20 minutes before he was released with a citation for loitering.

It is obvious Seltz is going to beat this charge as the Milwaukee statute for loitering reads as follows:

 loitering.jpg

Seltz goes to court on July 2. He called internal affairs to file a complaint and recorded the conversation.


Please send stories, tips and videos to carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com.

CARLOS MILLER'S LEGAL DEFENSE FUND

I am immersed in a legal case where I not only want to clear my criminal charges stemming from my arrest in January, but I want to sue the Miami-Dade Police Department for deleting my footage, which I was able to recover.

My goal is to set some type of precedent to ensure this does not happen as often as it does today where cops simply get away with it.

So if you would like to contribute, please click on the "donate" button below and contribute whatever you can afford.

 Hair Transplant 

Also, in an unrelated PINAC matter, I recently went through a hair transplant operation and I'm documenting my recovery on this blog if you are interested.

Milwaukee Cops Detain, Cuff and Cite Man for Recording Them in Public

A Milwaukee man was handcuffed and detained, then cited for loitering after video recording police on a public sidewalk.

Tim Seltz had been hanging inside a nightclub called Suite earlier this month when he stepped outside to smoke a cigarette.

He came across a group of police officers, some on horseback, some on motorcycles,  some on bicycles, some just milling about.

He pulled out his Flip cam and started recording.

“Go home,” one cop told him.

“You gotta get out of here with that camera,” another cop said.

He started asserting his right to record, which prompted them to start shining their lights in his face and pushing him away.

Meanwhile, a multitude of other citizens were allowed to congregate in the area without getting ordered away.

But they didn’t have cameras.

He continues recording until another cop walks up to him shining the light in his face, saying, “you can’t stand here and do this.”

At 3:20, a cop on horseback starts moving towards him with his flashlight in his face, ordering him to “keep walking.”

About a minute or so later, cops respond to some type of altercation between a couple of men, so Seltz follows them and continues recording.

While a group of officers stand around one of the men asking him question, Seltz stands a few feet behind them with his camera.

One of the cops orders him to move 20 feet away while permitting several other citizens without cameras to remain in the area.

But Seltz abides by the cop’s orders, walking backwards until he is standing in front of Suite again. The club he just spent $60 on drinks where he was celebrating his girlfriend’s 31st birthday.

That is when he comes across some jackass bouncer named Neil who accuses him of loitering for standing on the public sidewalk in front of the club.

Neil claims the club owns the sidewalk, which is complete “bullshit” as Seltz tells him. Nevertheless, Seltz begins to walk away under his girlfriend’s insistence.

But he didn’t get far because a cop grabbed him and handcuffed him.

Seltz was ordered to sit on a sidewalk for 20 minutes before he was released with a citation for loitering.

It is obvious Seltz is going to beat this charge as the Milwaukee statute for loitering reads as follows:

 loitering.jpg

Seltz goes to court on July 2. He called internal affairs to file a complaint and recorded the conversation.


Please send stories, tips and videos to carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com.

CARLOS MILLER’S LEGAL DEFENSE FUND

I am immersed in a legal case where I not only want to clear my criminal charges stemming from my arrest in January, but I want to sue the Miami-Dade Police Department for deleting my footage, which I was able to recover.

My goal is to set some type of precedent to ensure this does not happen as often as it does today where cops simply get away with it.

So if you would like to contribute, please click on the “donate” button below and contribute whatever you can afford.

 Hair Transplant 

Also, in an unrelated PINAC matter, I recently went through a hair transplant operation and I’m documenting my recovery on this blog if you are interested.

About Carlos Miller

Carlos Miller is founder and publisher of Photography is Not a Crime, which began as a one-man blog in 2007 to document his trial after he was arrested for photographing police during a journalistic assignment. He is also the author of The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which can be purchased through Amazon.
  • stk33

    Definition of “loiter”: “Stand or wait around idly or without apparent purpose.” Which means that if the officer is asking you why you are here, and you say “because I want to”, this falls under the definition of loitering, so yey, you have committed that crime. According to the law cited above, the officer should allow you to leave, which he did. If you refuse, then arrest is justified.

    The real issue should be taken with the ordinance that criminalizes “standing idly” – which is almost certainly unconstitutional. But it’s certainly up to the court rather than the cop.

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