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Monthly Archives: July 2012

California Man Insults Cop on Camera After Being Told to Back Off

A California man not only proved it is legal to record cops in public, something everybody should know by now, he also proved it is legal to insult them in a profanity-laced tirade.

He also proved to be an asshole, but that is not against the law.

“Fuck you, you fucking dick,” the man yelled at the Camarillo police officer as he was driving away.

“Have a good day, sir,” the cop responded.

“You should be scared, you corrupt little bitch,” the man with the camera continued.

“One of these days, it’s not going to be a guy with a camera.

“One of these days, people are going to be fed up with your fucking corruption, you little bitch.

“Get the fuck on. Get the fuck on, you little pig."

The cop’s only other words were, “See you later,” before starting his car and driving off.

The man with the camera goes by FunTrails on Youtube and is apparently a member of Camarillo Cop Watch in Ventura County.

He walked up to the police officer who was making a traffic stop in a construction zone where fines were doubled.

As soon as he walked up, the cop ordered him to move across the street, accusing him of distracting him, even though the man had not even talked to him at that point.

The man refused to move, pointing out that he was standing at least ten feet away. The cop called for back-up.

Eventually, a plainclothes Ventura County sheriff’s deputy pulled up as well as another Camarillo cop in a patrol car.

The deputy maintained his professionalism, even engaging the videographer in civil conversation. The second cop didn’t say a word.

Eventually, all three law enforcement officers stepped back in their cars and left, which is when the videographer launched into his tirade.

So even though his goal was to make the cops look stupid, he did the complete opposite, proving that the cops were aware that the First Amendment allows citizens to curse them out.

This was confirmed by the U.S. Department of Justice when it sent a set of guidelines to the Baltimore Police Department in May.

Even foul expressions of disapproval towards police officers are protected under the First Amendment.4 See, e.g., Duran v. City of Douglas, Arizona, 904 F.2d 1372, 1377-78 (9th Cir. 1990) (individual who was “making obscene gestures” and “yell[ed] profanities” at an officer engaged in conduct that “fell squarely within the protective umbrella of the First Amendment and any action to punish or deter such speech—such as stopping or hassling the speaker—is categorically prohibited by the Constitution.”).

In 2010, a Kansas man received a $5,000 settlement after he was arrested for telling a cop to fuck off and later that year, a Washington man received a $4,000 settlement.

In 2009,a Pennsylvania man who was arrested after flipping a cop off received a $50,000 settlement.

Earlier this month, a man sued the New York City Police Department for having arrested him for giving cops the middle finger.

According to Yahoo:

Robert Bell, an aspiring lawyer, stepped outside of a pub for a breath of fresh air in August of last year. After some police officers passed him, he raised his middle finger and flipped the cops off behind their backs. Bell didn't notice another cop standing nearby who witnessed the shocking gesture.

According to a suit filed recently, the officer asked Bell, "Do you think that's funny?" and before Bell could respond he was cuffed. When asked why he did it, Bell replied, "Because I don't like cops." He was hauled off to a holding cell where he taunted for his sexual orientation by officers. Bell was released after about two hours and later had his disorderly conduct charge dropped.

So perhaps we should all go out and start flipping cops off as a way to make a quick buck.

But I wouldn’t recommend it because civility goes a lot further in the long-run than a few thousand bucks.


Please send stories, tips and videos to carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com.

CARLOS MILLER'S LEGAL DEFENSE FUND

I am immersed in a legal case where I not only want to clear my criminal charges stemming from my arrest in January, but I want to sue the Miami-Dade Police Department for deleting my footage, which I was able to recover.

My goal is to set some type of precedent to ensure this does not happen as often as it does today where cops simply get away with it.

So if you would like to contribute, please click on the "donate" button below and contribute whatever you can afford.

Facebook PINAC Page

You can keep up with my stories by friending me on Facebook or following me on Twitter and/or Google + or by liking the PINAC Facebook page.

Hair Transplant 

Also, in an unrelated PINAC matter, I recently went through a hair transplant operation and I'm documenting my recovery on this blog if you are interested. I did not pay for this transplant, which is why I'm promoting the doctor through the hair transplant blog.

Read More »

Amtrak Cops Threaten to Arrest Reporter Despite Policy Allowing Photography

Oblivious to its own photo policy, Amtrak police threatened to arrest a reporter for having recorded a video of a TSA checkpoint at Chicago’s Union Station.

Julio Rausseo of We Are Change had video recorded Transportation Security Administration screeners setting up a checkpoint at the train station on July 5.

He uploaded the video, then returned to the station a week later where he sat in a restaurant video recording TSA screeners ordering their food.

That was when he was approached by an Amtrak police officer who recognized him from the previous encounter as you can see in the above video. Unfortunately, Rausseo never dared record the faces of the two cops who ended up harassing him.

The cop first said he was not allowed to record the checkpoint, which does not comply with Amtrak’s photo policy, which is posted not only on Amtrak's website but on the Amtrak police Wikipedia page. 

The cop then accused him of having trespassed in a restricted area when the original video clearly shows he was not.

And then the cop suggested that his video could have been used for “terrorist activity.”

When Rausseo asked him to elaborate, the cop explained that “people know the time, the date, you gave an explanation about TSA.”

Never mind the fact that thousands of people must have seen the TSA screeners setting up the checkpoint that day as you can see in the video below.

                      

The cop then demanded to see his identification. When Rausseo protested, a second cop showed up, explaining that they were conducting a Terry stop.

By law, a Terry stop requires the officers to have a reasonable suspicion or “specific and articulable facts” that a crime has just been committed or about to be committed.

In this case, the only “crime” that was committed was Rausseo having video recorded a security checkpoint and uploading the video to Youtube, which are not crimes, especially considering he made no indication in the video that he had committed a crime or was planning to commit a crime.

The second cop pointed out that Union Station is a privately owned building, which he said meant that Rausseo was required to get a permit before he was allowed to utilize his First Amendment rights to record.

“You're obviously a rookie journalist 'cause any seasoned journalist would know that you follow policy and procedure,” the cop told him.

“A normal journalist and a professional journalist would know to go to management office, get a permit, who you are, what you're doing and why you're doing it. Then they escort you, and you are able to execute your First Amendment rights."

Of course, a seasoned cop would also know that there is no requirement for reporters to get a permit.

And while it’s true that Union Station is owned by Amtrak, it is also true that Amtrak is a government-owned corporation, meaning it is funded by taxpayers.

Amtrak also has very clear photo policy listed on its website, thanks to its embarrassing flap in 2008 involving PINAC reader Duane Kerzic, who was arrested by Amtrak police for taking photos he planned to use in an Amtrak photo contest.

Kerzic, whose story went viral on PINAC, ended up being featured on The Colbert Show before winning a hefty settlement.

As a result of Kerzic’s arrest, Amtrak revised its photo policy in March 2009.

The policy, which I’ve posted below in its entirety, is no different than what you encounter at other transportation hubs, including the New York subway or the Miami-Dade Metrorail, in that allows photography and videography within public accessible areas, but not within restricted areas, which are not open to the public anyway.

It limits photography to hand-held cameras because tripods and lights would impede traffic. And while it recommends that reporters go through a formalized administrative procedure before conducting their work, it does not require them to do so.

It also requires commercial photographers, meaning photographers shooting ads or commercials, to get special permission.

The policy does give Amtrak police some leeway in harassing photographers if their “activity is suspicious in nature or inconsistent with this policy,” but the fact that Amtrak police had already viewed Rausseo’s video should have been an indicator that he was acting as a journalist, merely reporting his observations and his opinions.

The policy is pretty standard and not a very difficult to understand, but apparently the cops are having trouble with it.

“You can’t argue law with me, ok, because I’m competent and I know the law,” the second cop told Rausseo. “I’ve studied this ok and I know the way it works.”

Here’s giving that cop a second chance to study it because it obviously didn’t sink in the first time.

amtrak_photo_policy_1_2009_650x730.jpg


Please send stories, tips and videos to carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com.

CARLOS MILLER'S LEGAL DEFENSE FUND

I am immersed in a legal case where I not only want to clear my criminal charges stemming from my arrest in January, but I want to sue the Miami-Dade Police Department for deleting my footage, which I was able to recover.

My goal is to set some type of precedent to ensure this does not happen as often as it does today where cops simply get away with it.

So if you would like to contribute, please click on the "donate" button below and contribute whatever you can afford.

Facebook PINAC Page

You can keep up with my stories by friending me on Facebook or following me on Twitter and/or Google + or by liking the PINAC Facebook page.

Hair Transplant 

Also, in an unrelated PINAC matter, I recently went through a hair transplant operation and I'm documenting my recovery on this blog if you are interested. I did not pay for this transplant, which is why I'm promoting the doctor through the hair transplant blog.

Read More »

NYC Transit Cop Caught on Camera Body Slamming Young Man

A New York City Transit cop body slammed a young man inside the subway system, not just once but twice.

And two witnesses captured the entire incident with their video cameras.

At first, it appears as if the body slam was not justified, but I’ve watched it several times, including stopping the video at certain points, and now I’m not so sure because the young man appears to be holding onto the top of a billboard when the cop appears to be trying to bring his arms down to cuff them.

I’m curious as to what you guys think. No matter where you stand on this, the video shows the importance of being able to record openly without fear of arrest because it shows us what really took place.

One of the videographers, Dennis Galarza, believes it was completely unjustified.

“It wasn’t like the kid was trying to run,” he said in a telephone interview with Photography is Not a Crime Thursday afternoon.

“He had his hands in the air and his back towards the cop. What kind of resisting is that?”

Galarza also pointed out that the train tracks were only a few feet away.

“The kid wasn’t sure if the cop was going to throw him on the tracks. It was a natural reaction to hold onto the billboard.”

The incident took place last Thursday after the young man allegedly jumped the turnstile without paying a fare. The video was posted today.

At one point while he is being patted down, the young man’s body flinches but that might just be a natural reaction to having his genitals fondled by a cop.

Seconds later, it appears as if the cop is trying to bring his arms down to handcuff him, but it appears as if the young man insists on holding on to the top of the billboard.

That is when the cop grabs him around the waist and body slams him, bringing the billboard down with both of them.

The young man manages to stand up and grab what’s left of the billboard, but the cop brings him down again.

At this point, the young man is sitting on his ass while the cop has him in a headlock, giving him the old, “stop resisting” order.

The young man says he is not resisting and it doesn’t appear as if he is resisting.

But this is one of those situations that could go either way depending on how much leeway you give police officers.

The cop manages to handcuff him without further incident and walks him towards the citizens recording him.

Galarza keeps asking for the cop’s name and the cop tells him to stop interfering, but other than, doesn’t seem to take issue with the videographers.

Meanwhile, the young man in handcuffs keeps planting his feet, making it difficult for the cop to walk him out. At one point, the cop’s badge falls to the ground and he points at it to allow the videographer to get it on video, which he does: Badge number 23400.

Galarza, who has been cop watching for at least ten years, tells the young man to stop resisting, which is good advice. Once you are handcuffed, there is nothing you can to your advantage except just go along with the arrest.

Galarza, who is a member of a community organization called La Casita Comunal de Sunset Park, said they called a press conference today and handed out DVDs of the video to media organizations, including the New York Times and New York Daily News.

He also said five transit cops showed up to the press conference and attempted to attend.

“They’re supposed to be patrolling the subways,” Galarza said. “We didn’t let them in.”


Please send stories, tips and videos to carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com.

CARLOS MILLER'S LEGAL DEFENSE FUND

I am immersed in a legal case where I not only want to clear my criminal charges stemming from my arrest in January, but I want to sue the Miami-Dade Police Department for deleting my footage, which I was able to recover.

My goal is to set some type of precedent to ensure this does not happen as often as it does today where cops simply get away with it.

So if you would like to contribute, please click on the "donate" button below and contribute whatever you can afford.

Facebook PINAC Page

You can keep up with my stories by friending me on Facebook or following me on Twitter and/or Google + or by liking the PINAC Facebook page.

Hair Transplant 

Also, in an unrelated PINAC matter, I recently went through a hair transplant operation and I'm documenting my recovery on this blog if you are interested. I did not pay for this transplant, which is why I'm promoting the doctor through the hair transplant blog.

Read More »

DC Cops Confiscate Phone, Steal Memory Card, Day After New Photo Policy Implemented

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On the day after Washington D.C. police implemented a new general order stating they must respect the rights of citizens who record them in public, an undercover cop snatched a cell phone from a man who was recording an investigation in public.

When they finally returned the phone back to Earl Staley later that day, he said his memory card was missing.

Now the ACLU, which assisted in drafting the policy, says that perhaps the officer did not know of the guidelines.

That’s still no excuse.

Because even though the general order, which came as a result of Jerome Vorus’ lawsuit, clearly states what police can and can’t do when it comes to dealing with civilians recording them in public, it doesn’t create any new laws that police must learn.

It simply spells out the existing laws in easy-to-read language that even the dumbest of cops can understand. Just in case they have not been keeping up with the multitude of court decisions that have arose over the last few years throughout the country stating that police do not have an expectation of privacy in public.

Or the U.S. Department of Justice guidelines issued straight out of Washington D.C. to the Baltimore Police Department two months earlier.

According to My Fox DC:

Staley says his smartphone was snatched by a D.C. Police officer last Friday evening along Raleigh Place in Southeast D.C. Staley says he saw police punching a man they were arresting and another plain-clothes officer harassing the people watching.

"So I go and grab my phone and start trying to record it," says Staley, a 26-year-old employee of a private, non-profit mental health agency in the District. "And once I do that, another vice cop reaches over my back and grabs my phone and tells me he's not giving my phone back."

"That was the wrong thing for the officer to do," says the ACLU's Art Spitzer.

He says that officer may not have known about a new General Order issued by D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier that went into effect last Thursday.

"And the order is completely clear that in terms of preventing a person from taking pictures. The police are never to do that," Spitzer continues.

Police told My Fox DC that “they are looking into it,” which means that we will most likely hear nothing more about the incident unless Staley files a lawsuit.

And even then, that is still not going to stop this abuse. But at least maybe it will make up for some of the images lost, which included hundreds of pictures of his four-year-old daughter.

First thing Staley should do is file an internal affairs complaint because even though we know that will result in the officer not getting disciplined, it may help Staley identify and publicize the name of the cop who abused his right to record in public.

And if anything, perhaps fear of exposure and humiliation might make him think twice in the future of doing that to another citizen.

Then again, it probably won’t.

 


Please send stories, tips and videos to carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com.

 

CARLOS MILLER'S LEGAL DEFENSE FUND

I am immersed in a legal case where I not only want to clear my criminal charges stemming from my arrest in January, but I want to sue the Miami-Dade Police Department for deleting my footage, which I was able to recover.

My goal is to set some type of precedent to ensure this does not happen as often as it does today where cops simply get away with it.

So if you would like to contribute, please click on the "donate" button below and contribute whatever you can afford.

Facebook PINAC Page

You can keep up with my stories by friending me on Facebook or following me on Twitter and/or Google + or by liking the PINAC Facebook page.

Hair Transplant 

Also, in an unrelated PINAC matter, I recently went through a hair transplant operation and I'm documenting my recovery on this blog if you are interested. I did not pay for this transplant, which is why I'm promoting the doctor through the hair transplant blog.

Read More »

San Diego Police Arrest Photojournalist for the 2nd Time Since January

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Less than a month after charges were dismissed from his last arrest, San Diego photojournalist Edward Baier was arrested again, indicating that police are retaliating against him.

After all, he was arrested Friday for interfering with a police officer when all he was trying to do was video record an ongoing investigation involving some whacked out dude attempting to stuff a brick inside a mailbox.

That, of course, prompted citizens to think terrorism, which led to a multitude of San Diego police officers responding to the scene.

Baier, a freelance videographer who sells his footage to local television stations, was one of the first to respond after hearing about the incident on his police scanner.

He was there before police had even taped off the area, so he began interviewing possible witnesses, including the owner of the home whose water hose the man also tried to stuff into the mailbox.

The brick also came from this man’s yard. And the USPS mailbox stood on the public sidewalk just outside his property. A short brick wall divided the man’s property from the sidewalk.

“At this point, I had no idea what was going on,” Baier said in a telephone interview with Photography is Not a Crime. “But the police kept arriving and they started blocking off the streets.”

Baier set up his tripod on the sidewalk and started talking to the man who was standing on his property. The wall between them was about two-and-a-half feet as you can see in one of Baier's photos below.

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The man was explaining how some random stranger walked into his yard, picked up a brick, then tried to stuff it into the mailbox. He then walked back onto the yard, grabbed the water hose and tried to do the same.

A woman spotted this bizarre behavior and figured he was some Al Qaeda operative trying to blow up the mailbox, so she called police.

A police car pulled up containing two officers, one who already has a history with Baier.

“That cop told me specifically, ‘you have to leave, it is too dangerous to stay here,’” Baier said.

“But there were at least four other people standing around, including the owner and three other people on the sidewalks.”

Baier asked the property owner if he could step onto his yard and continue working on his footage. The man said yes.

When Baier started to step over the short brick wall, one officer grabbed his wrist and brought him down with the other officer joining in.

“They twisted my arm and I landed on my face on the brick wall,” Baier said.

“They kept yelling, ‘stop resisting.’”

His face ended up breaking a couple of bricks from the top of the wall as you can see in the photos below.

Then they handcuffed him and shoved him into the back of a patrol car.

san_diego_20120721_00270.jpg

The Wall was already cracked but the RED BRICKS on top where damaged when my chest and face impacted the top of the wall, Baier wrote in the email when he sent these photos.

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Meanwhile, police had nothing to say to the other four men watching the altercation unfold.

They impounded his camera, threw him in jail and did not return his camera until the following Monday. And only because Mickey Osterreicher started giving them hell on Saturday (I was with Mickey that day in Fort Lauderdale so I witnessed his telephone conversation with one of the assistant chiefs).

mickey_osterreicher.jpg

Baier ended up with a dislocated thumb, a sore elbow and abrasions on his face and body.

He has gone to the doctor who stated the following in a request for evaluation of his thumb.

Mr. Baier had an injury to his right thumb on Friday, July 20th.  Upon evaluation, I believe that his first metacarpophlangeal joint stabilizing ligaments are torn on the index finger side. Please evaluate and give Mr. Baier your opinion on treatment options.


Please send stories, tips and videos to carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com.

CARLOS MILLER'S LEGAL DEFENSE FUND

I am immersed in a legal case where I not only want to clear my criminal charges stemming from my arrest in January, but I want to sue the Miami-Dade Police Department for deleting my footage, which I was able to recover.

My goal is to set some type of precedent to ensure this does not happen as often as it does today where cops simply get away with it.

So if you would like to contribute, please click on the "donate" button below and contribute whatever you can afford.

Facebook PINAC Page

You can keep up with my stories by friending me on Facebook or following me on Twitter and/or Google + or by liking the PINAC Facebook page.

Hair Transplant 

Also, in an unrelated PINAC matter, I recently went through a hair transplant operation and I'm documenting my recovery on this blog if you are interested. I did not pay for this transplant, which is why I'm promoting the doctor through the hair transplant blog.

Read More »

Jerome Vorus Wins Settlement that Requires D.C. Cops to Abide by New Photo Guidelines

Two years after he was detained by cops in Washington D.C. for photographing them on a public street, Jerome Vorus reached a settlement with the Metropolitan Police Department that requires officers to abide by newly implemented guidelines when dealing with photographers.

At 21 years of age, Vorus is not naïve enough to believe the new guidelines will immediately change their unconstitutional ways.

But the settlement also came with a nice financial bonus that will allow him to upgrade his camera arsenal and continue testing their knowledge of Constitutional law.

“I plan to buy a Canon 5D Mark III and maybe a couple of hidden cameras I can wear on my body,” he said during a telephone interview with Photography is Not a Crime Monday afternoon.

 Vorus doesn’t want to publicize the amount because he wants to focus on the new guidelines, which are similar to the ones issued by the U.S. Department of Justice in May or the ones issued by the Miami Beach Police Department last year.

“I was glad I was instrumental along with the ACLU in making these changes because this is not just a victory for myself but a victory for all photographers in this city and hopefully around the country,” he said.

He plans to carry the guidelines with him as he walks around the city to ensure that the multitude of other law enforcement agencies in the capital, including the U.S. Park Police, U.S. Secret Service, U.S. Federal Protective Services, U.S. Mint Police, U.S. Capitol Police and Metro Transit Police also abide by the same guidelines.

vorus_dc_cops_620x413.jpg

Vorus was detained for 30 minutes in July 2010 after he snapped the above photo of cops making a traffic stop in Georgetown.

It was the second time in four months he had been detained for photographing cops. This is how I wrote about it back then:

A male cop demanded to know what he was doing. He asked if he was being detained. The cop hemmed and hawed and told him no, he was not being detained. That he was free to go.

“As I was walking away, two other units pulled up,” he said in a phone interview with Photography is Not a Crime.

A female officer then stepped out and demanded his identification. He asked again if he was being detained. He also started recording the conversation.

“I notified her that I was only required to provide her with ID if I was suspected of a crime,” he said.

“She said, ‘yes, you’re being detained.’ I said, ‘now that we’ve established I’m being detained, here is my ID,’.”

The officer, who was under the impression that it was illegal to photograph police in public, then checked to see if he had any warrants against him. She also said it was illegal for him to audio record her, which he was doing openly.

That officer should not have any question about the legality of the citizens photographing cops anymore if she bothers reading the new guidelines, which state the following:

As long as the photographing or recording takes place in a setting at which the individual has a legal right to be present and does not interfere with a member’s safety, members shall not inform or instruct people that photographing or recording of police officers, police activity or individuals who are the subject of police action (such as a Terry stop or an arrest) is not allowed; requires a permit; or requires the member’s consent. Additionally, members shall not:

1. Order that person to cease such activity;

2. Demand that person's identification;

3. Demand that the person state a reason why he or she is taking photographs or recording;

4. Detain that person;

5. Intentionally block or obstruct cameras or recording devices; or

6. In any way threaten, intimidate or otherwise discourage an individual from recording members’ enforcement activities.

After buying his new camera gear, Vorus will have some money left over to fly down to Miami where we will test local police on their knowledge of the First Amendment.

And now that he’s 21, I’ll be able to buy him a beer, unlike the time I hung out with him in D.C. last December when he was still 20.

373798_10150502896544636_1220836585_n.jpg


Please send stories, tips and videos to carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com.

CARLOS MILLER'S LEGAL DEFENSE FUND

I am immersed in a legal case where I not only want to clear my criminal charges stemming from my arrest in January, but I want to sue the Miami-Dade Police Department for deleting my footage, which I was able to recover.

My goal is to set some type of precedent to ensure this does not happen as often as it does today where cops simply get away with it.

So if you would like to contribute, please click on the "donate" button below and contribute whatever you can afford.

Facebook PINAC Page

You can keep up with my stories by friending me on Facebook or following me on Twitter and/or Google + or by liking the PINAC Facebook page.

Hair Transplant 

Also, in an unrelated PINAC matter, I recently went through a hair transplant operation and I'm documenting my recovery on this blog if you are interested. I did not pay for this transplant, which is why I'm promoting the doctor through the hair transplant blog.

Read More »

Anaheim Cops Kill 2nd Man in 2 Days; Prevent Citizens from Recording Investigation

Anaheim police killed two men, shot multiple rounds of rubber bullets and unleashed a dog on a mother and child as tensions surpassed a boiling point over the weekend.

Naturally, they are doing their best to prevent footage of their actions from making the internet, including offering to buy footage from citizens who recorded them terrorizing a crowd of protesters Saturday to shining their flashlights into the cameras of citizens moments after they shot and killed a handcuffed man Sunday.

Hundreds of citizens are expected to join an already growing group of protesters who have been gathering outside the Anaheim Police Department for weekly protests against police abuse for more than two years.

Perhaps it's not surprising that Anaheim borders Fullerton in Orange County, California, the city where police  brutally murdered Kelly Thomas last year.

The first man they shot and killed this weekend was Manuel Diaz, an unarmed man whose only crime was running away from police when they approached him and a couple of friends standing by a car Saturday afternoon.

The above video was recorded moments after he was shot and citizens can be heard saying, “He’s still alive.”

That prompted officers to order the citizens back as Diaz lay on the grass dying a slow death with no sign of a paramedic for more than three minutes.

The second man they shot and killed was Joel Acevedo, a suspected car thief who police say fired at them first. Although they say they recovered a gun, at least one witness speculated the gun was planted.

It wouldn’t be surprising considering they wouldn’t allow anybody to record.

According to the Orange County Weekly:

Witnesses have told the source the man was handcuffed, then shot by police. No one is being allowed to take photos, according to the source. When a group tried to take photos from an upstairs apartment, police shined a bright light onto the residents to block the view.

Diaz, pictured in the first photo, and Acevedo, pictured in the second photo, are the latest in a long list of young Hispanic men to be killed by Anaheim Police in the last two years.

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joel_acevedo_thumb_550x310.jpg

After Diaz was shot Saturday, police fired multiple rounds of rubber bullets into a crowd of protesters, then unleashed a dog on a woman and her child. Police say the dog broke free by accident.

Police also say they started shooting rubber bullets after the protesters began throwing bottles but citizens say there were only a few plastic bottles being tossed.

Watch the melee in the video below.


Please send stories, tips and videos to carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com.

CARLOS MILLER'S LEGAL DEFENSE FUND

I am immersed in a legal case where I not only want to clear my criminal charges stemming from my arrest in January, but I want to sue the Miami-Dade Police Department for deleting my footage, which I was able to recover.

My goal is to set some type of precedent to ensure this does not happen as often as it does today where cops simply get away with it.

So if you would like to contribute, please click on the "donate" button below and contribute whatever you can afford.

Facebook PINAC Page

You can keep up with my stories by friending me on Facebook or following me on Twitter and/or Google + or by liking the PINAC Facebook page.

Hair Transplant 

Also, in an unrelated PINAC matter, I recently went through a hair transplant operation and I'm documenting my recovery on this blog if you are interested. I did not pay for this transplant, which is why I'm promoting the doctor through the hair transplant blog.

Read More »

Anaheim Cops Fire Rubber Bullets and Sic Dog into Crowd, then Attempt to Buy Witness' Videos

 

Anaheim police fired multiple rounds of rubber bullets into a crowd of citizens, then sicced a dog on a mother and her child before attempting to collect the video evidence shot by bystanders.

However, instead of confiscating the footage as cops are notorious for doing, they attempted to buy the footage.

The citizens apparently refused because at least one video made on KCAL-TV as you can see in the above video.

The citizens were protesting against an earlier officer-involved shooting that left one man dead.

An Associated Press report cites the footage as shot by KCAL but the video itself is stamped with the words "amatuer video."

Police said they fired rubber bullets because some people in the crowd started throwing bottles.

They also said the dog was "deployed accidentally." 

UPDATE: Anaheim police kill a second man in two days, then try to prevent citizens from recording investigation.

Read More »

Pennsylvania Cop with Sordid History Sued for Wrongful Wiretapping Arrest

Kevin Lukart was a 30-year-old police officer in Apollo, Pennsylvania when he exposed himself to a 17-year-old girl while on duty in 2000.

He was a police officer in Braddock, Pennsylvania when he was caught in the above 2007 video punching a handcuffed suspect twice before shoving him into the back of a squad car.

And he was a police officer in Point Marion, Pennsylvania when he arrested a man earlier this year on wiretapping charges for video recording him yelling at a man in a wheelchair.

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So odds are, the lawsuit filed against him this week stemming from the false wiretapping charge won’t have much of an impact on his career.

But that’s not stopping Gregory Rizer for moving forward with his ACLU-assisted suit against Lukart, who has a long history of police misconduct in Pennsylvania.

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Rizer was arrested on wiretapping charges on January 5. His case was dismissed on February 22. His phone was not returned until a month later.

And when it was, the SIM card was missing, so Rizer said he was unable to access the video.

“He’s been dismissed from at least five police departments,” Rizer said in a telephone interview with Photography is Not a Crime Friday morning.

“It just goes on and on.”

Lukart is apparently the Pennsylvania equivalent of German Bosque, the South Florida cop who has been fired six times and is currently making $60,000 a year for doing nothing more than sitting at home.

It all started on January 3 when Rizer was visiting a friend who happens to be wheelchair-bound.

Lukart suddenly pounded on the door, looking for the man’s cousin, who had outrun him in a previous incident.

“He was trying to get information but the way he was doing it was like Robocop,” Rizer said. “He was getting in my friend’s face. I walked to the other side of the room and started videotaping.”

When Lukart noticed Rizer recording, he stormed up to him, handcuffed him and threw him in the back of the squad car, driving him to the police station.

At the time, Lukart had no idea about the laws regarding the recording of police in public, so he believed he had committed a crime.

“He said give me your phone, you are breaking the wiretapping law,” Rizer said.

He then made Rizer sign a statement acknowledging that he had broken the law. Rizer signed it, stating he did not know it was against the law.

Lukart then released Rizer but did not return his phone.

When Rizer got home, he began conducting research on the internet, not only learning that he had not broken the law, but that Lukart had quite a sordid history.

“I took it up with the mayor to let him know what type of person (Lukart) was,” Rizer said. “I just wanted to get my phone back.”

But Mayor Carl Ables is apparently good friends with Lukart, informing the cop of Rizer’s visit.

Two days later, Lukart started banging on Rizer’s door accompanied by the police chief to re-arrest him on the wiretapping charge. This time, Rizer spent several hours in jail before bonding out.

Attorney Glen Downey of the ACLU filed the lawsuit in Rizer’s behalf Thursday.


Please send stories, tips and videos to carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com.

CARLOS MILLER'S LEGAL DEFENSE FUND

I am immersed in a legal case where I not only want to clear my criminal charges stemming from my arrest in January, but I want to sue the Miami-Dade Police Department for deleting my footage, which I was able to recover.

My goal is to set some type of precedent to ensure this does not happen as often as it does today where cops simply get away with it.

So if you would like to contribute, please click on the "donate" button below and contribute whatever you can afford.

Facebook PINAC Page

You can keep up with my stories by friending me on Facebook or following me on Twitter and/or Google + or by liking the PINAC Facebook page.

Hair Transplant 

Also, in an unrelated PINAC matter, I recently went through a hair transplant operation and I'm documenting my recovery on this blog if you are interested. I did not pay for this transplant, which is why I'm promoting the doctor through the hair transplant blog.

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South Florida Cop Detains Man for Walking Down Street with Camera

A man walking down a public street in broad daylight was stopped by a police officer who found him suspicious.

The reason? The man was carrying a video camera.

The incident took place earlier this month in Surfside, a sleepy municipality in Miami-Dade County notorious for its speed traps.

The video, which is more than seven minutes long, has annoying gaps where the audio cuts out and it seems as if it was purposely done to keep from having the man’s personal information from being broadcast.

It was uploaded to a Youtube account under the username Theodore Smith.

The cop peppers him with multiple questions about where he lives, where he is walking to and why he is carrying a camera.

The cop also demands his identification and learning he has none, the cop demands to know his name.

The cop then calls for back up and continues interrogating him before patting him down.

And even after it was determined he was not breaking the law, the cop kept going on and on about how "suspicious" it is to be walking down the street with a video camera.

This is how a writer from the Miami New Times described cops from Surfside in an unrelated article:

The police officers in Surfside — the little town south of Sunny Isles Beach where I've lived for more than three years — might be the biggest horndogs in the state. They hide in the bushes of a parking lot on Harding Avenue, trap drivers doing 37 mph, and lay their pudgy, Oakley-sunglasses-wearing mack game down on any passing female pedestrians, including my girlfriend. Confront them about it, and they become steely RoboCops.


Please send stories, tips and videos to carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com.

CARLOS MILLER'S LEGAL DEFENSE FUND

I am immersed in a legal case where I not only want to clear my criminal charges stemming from my arrest in January, but I want to sue the Miami-Dade Police Department for deleting my footage, which I was able to recover.

My goal is to set some type of precedent to ensure this does not happen as often as it does today where cops simply get away with it.

So if you would like to contribute, please click on the "donate" button below and contribute whatever you can afford.

Facebook PINAC Page

You can keep up with my stories by friending me on Facebook or following me on Twitter and/or Google + or by liking the PINAC Facebook page.

Hair Transplant 

Also, in an unrelated PINAC matter, I recently went through a hair transplant operation and I'm documenting my recovery on this blog if you are interested. I did not pay for this transplant, which is why I'm promoting the doctor through the hair transplant blog.

Read More »

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