Home / PINAC News / Florida Man Records Himself Getting Attacked by Cop for not Rolling Down Window all the way

Florida Man Records Himself Getting Attacked by Cop for not Rolling Down Window all the way

A horrifying video has emerged showing St. Petersburg police forcing a man out of his car before pouncing on him, leaving him hospitalized with several injuries, all because the cop claimed he was in fear for his life.

At least that what he says in his report, where he wrote the following:

I exited my marked patrol cruiser and walked towards the vehicle and I noticed the driver staring at me with a blank stare as he continued revving the engine louder and louder. I thought by his actions the subject was going to attempt to hit me with his car.

The video, however, shows it was Curtis Shannon, a young man from Florida who was probably fearing for his life during the arrest.

It also shows that he remained professional as he tried to hand the cop his license and registration through a small opening after the cop pulled him over for what he claimed was erratic driving.

But if anything was erratic, it the was behavior of the cop, whom unfortunately, Shannon refuses to identify out of what he says is “respect.”

But the cop deserves no respect because he was downright criminal. A thug with a badge. A proud member of the Blue Mafia.

Out of respect for the officers (why I still have any is mystery) I omitted their names from the report.

However, you can call the St. Petersburg Media Relations Department at 727-893-7550 and ask for the cop’s name. Then you can follow it up with a public records request for his internal affairs summary, which I’m betting is not empty. The department explains how this can be done here.

But they probably won’t abide by the law to provide the records on this cop, so if need guidance, so perhaps Charlie Grapski, Director of the PINAC Open Records Project, can offer guidance. Email him at charliegrapski@pinac.org.

Post your experiences in the comments section please as the video will infuriate you.

The window was just over a quarter of the way down and it was December. Even in Florida, the nights get pretty cold. So I asked him, “Why did you pull me over, officer?”. A seemingly innocent question, right?

Wrong! He responded with “Because I wanted to, now step out of the vehicle!”. WHAT? This can’t be happening! I have no criminal record, my registration is current (not that he would know any of that, he refused to take my papers), and I definitely don’t have a busted tail light. So I responded ” ‘Because I want to’ isn’t a legal reason to pull someone over, let alone ask them out of a car. Can you tell me why you pulled me over?”

“This isn’t up for debate, step out of the car.” Now, he’s being very hostile, I’m still sitting there wondering why. He won’t take my papers, he wants me out of the car, and he won’t take my papers. What’s the deal?

“Sir, I don’t feel comfortable getting out of the car when I don’t even know why you’re here. Why do you need me to step out of the car? I’m not a criminal and my papers are all legal.”

“You know what? One way or another, I’m getting you out of the car. What’s the name of this complex?”

In the video, Shannon continues to defy his orders to step out, which was within his complete right to do so.

“I will not step out of this car so you can beat the hell out of me,” Shannon says at one point.

But eventually he did step out. And the cop did beat the hell out of him. And luckily, the video did survive.

The incident took place in December but Shannon just posted it online Sunday after launching a Go Fund Me campaign to raise money to “help my family recover.”

Perhaps the phone had been confiscated and he just got the phone back but that is not mentioned in his report. Perhaps police were unable to access it due to a passcode and finally just gave it back.

At this time, he has raised $60 out of a projected $5,000.

Story continues below...



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The story was first reported by South Florida Cop Block. I reposted most of his story  below but click here for the entire story and to donate.

On December 26th 2013 at 9:30pm, I was driving home from work. I purchaced a pizza pie from a local pizzaria so my wife wouldn’t have to cook. She was still adjusting to the mother’s life, our only son was only 5 months old at the time. Just before I got home, a police cruiser pulled behind my car and was following me very closely. We both stopped at a red light. When it turned green, and just after I started making the last turn before I got home, lights started flashing. Being less than a half, block from home, I put my hazard lights on and slowly drove to, and backed into, my parking space. I then turned off my car, and headlights, turned on the interior lights and waited to see what the issue was.

The officer didn’t approach my car immediately (remember, I backed into my spot. His car was now in front of mine and mine was off). Instead, he called for me to get my license and registration. This struck me as odd, even if I did have my information ready, how would he get it from way over there? I told him it would be a little bit, I hadn’t needed my registration papers since I bought the car and now it was buried under many miscelaneous papers. This is when he approached my car. He asked me again for my papers, and again I told him I was looking for them. When I found them, I offered it to him, but he woudn’t take them. Instead, he asked me to roll my window all the way down. This, again, was a weird and unecessary request. The window was just over a quarter of the way down and it was December. Even in Florida, the nights get pretty cold. So I asked him, “Why did you pull me over, officer?”. A seemingly innocent question, right?

Wrong! He responded with “Because I wanted to, now step out of the vehicle!”. WHAT? This can’t be happening! I have no criminal record, my registration is current (not that he would know any of that, he refused to take my papers), and I definitely don’t have a busted tail light. So I responded ” ‘Because I want to’ isn’t a legal reason to pull someone over, let alone ask them out of a car. Can you tell me why you pulled me over?”

“This isn’t up for debate, step out of the car.” Now, he’s being very hostile, I’m still sitting there wondering why. He won’t take my papers, he wants me out of the car, and he won’t take my papers. What’s the deal?

“Sir, I don’t feel comfortable getting out of the car when I don’t even know why you’re here. Why do you need me to step out of the car? I’m not a criminal and my papers are all legal.”

“You know what? One way or another, I’m getting you out of the car. What’s the name of this complex?”

I told him and he walked around to the back of my car to check my license plates and call for back-up. Now, I’m worried, fearful, and annoyed. It was cear to me that this officer was looking for some action, and he wasn’t leaving without it. Being from a place where racial profiling is the norm and police brutality goes by unpunished, New York City, I took the few seconds I grabbed and set up my cell phone to record the rest of the situation. I’ll let the video tell the next few bits of the story. I apologize in advance for your coming neck pain.

As you can see and hear, while I tried to remain as calm, courteous, and respectful as the situation would allow, the officer only grew more and more hostile as the the encounter progressed. So much so, that I requested he physically changed places with another officer who didn’t look like he wanted to slam my head into the ground. I even tried revealing that I was a military veteran, hopefully that would calm him down a bit, we’re on the same side. That cleary wasn’t heppening, but you do hear another officer assure me that no physical harm would come to me. I took his word for it (silly me), grabbed my phone (now a camcorder) so I could continue recording from outside the car and openned the car door.

As you can hear, the aggressive officer immidiately grabbed me by the collar and tried to yank me out of the car. I asked him to let me go, I was already cooperating and that hostility was the reason I didn’t want to get out of the car in the first place. Even so, I let go of the frame of my car and accepted my fate. I was getting beat up tonight, there’s no denying that. The officer then slammed me onto the ground, making sure that my head made full contact with the curb on the way down.

He got on top of me and demanded I give him my arm (so he could handcuff me). I couldn’t. He was intentionally pinning that arm to the ground with his knee and he knew it. For almost two minutes, he would elbow me in the back of the head (elbows don’t leave bruises or bumps as easily), knee me in the ribs and kept yelling for me to give him my arm. Then it started to make sense. As the stars flashed behind my eyelids after every strike, I realized that we are between two parked cars. No one can see us. As far as anyone else can tell, I’m fighting this officer on the ground. So I just laid there and shouted as loud as I could , “YOU’RE PINNING MY ARM TO THE GROUND!! QUIT PUNCHING ME!!” He stops and you can start to hear the mumbles and murmurs of the neighbors as they start to discuss what’s happening. The officer realized that playtime is over and cuffs me. When he gets me off the ground, I could see the mischevous grins on two of the officers’ faces. The third one, the one who said I would’nt be harmed, just stood there almost in disbelief. Maybe he was new, I don’t know.

I spent the night in jail and the next day at the Veterans Hospital getting treated for the scraped and bruises from the incident, and the rash I got from the clothes I was issued.

Curtis Shannon

About Carlos Miller

Carlos Miller is founder and publisher of Photography is Not a Crime, which began as a one-man blog in 2007 to document his trial after he was arrested for photographing police during a journalistic assignment. He is also the author of The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which can be purchased through Amazon.