Arizona Deputies Claim Protester's Open Safety Pin Prick is Felonious Assault - PINAC News
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Arizona Deputies Claim Protester’s Open Safety Pin Prick is Felonious Assault

Arizona deputies must’ve feared for their lives, when a protester’s open safety pin contacted their delicate pink flesh as you can see in the video going viral below.

They arrested the protester who was attending an Arizona House of Representatives hearing, wearing an Anonymous mask over his head, not covering his face, as lawmakers discussed the voter suppression fiasco at this month’s Presidential primary vote.

So, Arizona deputies decided to remove this one citizen for no apparent reason, as he was participating in his own government’s decisions.

Bystanders can be heard off-camera yelling “let him go” and “he didn’t do anything”.

The man refused to budge, calmly waiting to have his voice heard.

Arizona deputies then climbed over the chamber’s seats, in one of the most uncoordinated dancing acts ever recorded on video or film by local PR person Stacey Champion and two other alert citizens with cell phones.

Two Arizona deputies approached the man – who was sitting peacefully as the video began – from behind.

They told the citizen to come with them, forcing him to leave the Arizona House of Representatives special hearing, called by Rep. Michelle Ugenti-Rita to investigate a major alleged voter suppression in the state capitol’s own county.

Maricopa County – Arizona’s most populous – shuttered 140 out of 200 polling places leading to long lines and missed votes at the remaining 60 polling precincts.

Screaming and yelling from the audience rained down upon their elected officials through the meeting, as they demanded answers about limited polling locations and claims of voter discrimination.

Police are fond of the narrative that they “guided him to the ground” about suspects, and it’s likely to appear in the Arizona deupties’ reports on this incident, but it looked more like a monkey fucking a football.

It took the Arizona deputies the better part of five minutes, to gain control of, and escort the citizen from the House of Representatives’ viewing gallery.

A deputy steps over the seats and tries to forcibly remove the man, who is only identified as Shane by a woman yelling.

As the officer straddles the seats he reaches back and tells the man he touches to not touch him.

The only people touching anyone are the officers, who are seen stepping on and pushing down on the man’s shoulder.

People are seen moving out of the way to not become part of the scuffle that is unfolding before them.

As the officers are stepping over and pulling the man out of his seat. An obviously agitated crowd is yelling for the officers to leave him alone as many run for cover.

“SHAME, SHAME, SHAME, SHAME,” rang out from the gallery.

But Arizona deputies have little of that, and continued extracting the citizen from his seat.

Anecdotal evidence from Arizona voters is piling up, describing the scene the desert state’s citizens encountered when trying to place their vote – for candidates of any party – this month:

“On Tuesday I took my parents to the Church of the Beatitudes to cast their ballots. My parents are 83 and 87 years old both requiring walkers. When we arrived the line was all of the way around and down Glendale Ave.

“I tried to find a handicapped parking spot to no avail after looking for 20 minutes. I looked to see if there was an area (with seating and shade)where I could drop my parents so they could wait for me while I waited in line for them. Again, to no avail.

“After an hour of deciding what to do my parents were exhausted and we returned home without voting. It broke my heart that these two hard working, constitution respecting retires could not cast their vote in this election.”

“My parents taught me the importance of my vote and that I should be proud that I live in the USA and have the right to vote. Unfortunately, my beloved parents were effectively turned away from being able to cast their vote and denied their constitutional right. I am still sad for them.”

As the Arizona House Representatives alternately pandered and back-peddled verbally, about the various reasons for shortcomings in the presidential primary election process.

The peanut gallery was unimpressed.

Arizona’s state House of Representatives needed to rectify the situation by hearing their constituents calls.

No level of petition or dissent should lead any citizen becoming an ideological political prisoner, just for exercising their first amendment rights

America’s political process today is designed to quell the ever faint voices of those willing to stand up, and to have their voices heard.

Arizona deputies this week answered the cry for justice with violent force.

Instead, Arizona’s House of Representatives today stands divided, with on one side the citizens deprived of their right to vote, and on the other side those who would govern without listening.

Now a citizen stands accused of a felony crime against police, because one Arizona deputy prick can’t stand a little safety pin prick.

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