Maryland Judge Pleads Guilty, Ordering Man To Be Tased in Court - PINAC News
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Maryland Judge Pleads Guilty, Ordering Man To Be Tased in Court

A Maryland judge lost his cool in court; now the judge has lost his job and his innocence.

Charles County Judge Robert Nalley thought it was a good idea to use a stun device on a man for talking.

As a result, Judge Nalley was fired and criminally charged.

Newly released video shows the July 2014 incident where defendant Delvon King was in Charles County Circuit Court on gun charges.

King was in the midst of making a point, but Judge Nalley didn’t want to hear what King had to say– telling him to stop talking twice.

But when King kept making his legal argument, Judge Nalley decided it was time for some shock therapy.

The judge ordered a sheriffs deputy to activate a pair of 50,000-volt stun cuffs that were shackled to the ankles of the defendant.

Upon the high voltage shock, King careened into the floor screaming in obvious pain.

Delvon King on the ground after being jolted with 50,000 volts. (Credit: Charles County, Md. Circuit Court)

Delvon King on the ground after being jolted with 50,000 volts. (Credit: Charles County, Md. Circuit Court)

Judge Nalley admitted that he made an error in judgment.

The judge plead guilty to the crime. Judge Nalley was sentenced to a year of probation, a $5,000 fine, and mandatory anger management classes.

The judge was also banned from being a judge for life.

Kristi O’Malley who was the prosecutor in the case said:

“[Judge Nalley] very quickly grew impatient, and his ordering of the stun device was highly disproportionate for nothing more than verbal interruptions. Our constitution does not allow a violation of rights based on annoyance”

Furthermore, U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein said in a statement:

“Disruptive defendants may be excluded from the courtroom and prosecuted for obstruction of justice and contempt of court, but force may not be used in the absence of danger.”

In 2009, Judge Nally also was convicted of slashing the tires of a court employee that parked in his un-designated parking space at the court.

He eventually plead guilty to the tire slashing; he was fined, ordered to write a letter of apology, and received a five day suspension without pay.

But the judge didn’t learn his lesson, and now he’s just another convict.

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