Drunk Texas Cop Shoots Up Church, Blames Black People, Not Charged - PINAC News
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Drunk Texas Cop Shoots Up Church, Blames Black People, Not Charged

“My boys are getting killed in Dallas,” the slouched-over deputy said as he drunkenly sat in the church parking lot. “The black coon started killing my boys in Dallas.”

A Texas cop won’t be charged with a crime after he had few too many drinks and shot up the Shiloh Cumberland Presbyterian Church in Somervell County, Texas, and recklessly fired his police-issued pistol into a surrounding residential neighborhood.

Residents in the rural area dialed 911 and reported the gunshots. The Ovilla Police Department, which has nine sworn officers for the entire town of 3,500 residents, responded to the call.

The responding Ovilla officer arrived to find Somervell County Sheriff’s Deputy William Cox sitting in the church parking lot.


An inebriated Cox fessed-up to shooting bullets at the church and into the residential area and explained he was upset over the Dallas police ambush, got too drunk and had to let off stress. So, he drunkenly reasoned, he was letting off stress when he decided to shoot his police-issued pistol at a church and into a residential neighborhood after he got drunk in the church parking lot.

After hearing some of Cox’s explanation, the Ovilla cop handcuffed him and took him into custody until a sheriff arrived.


After the officer placed in him the police car, the in-car-cam shows a shirtless and sobbing, Deputy William Cox admitting he shot his department-issued gun into the church, damaging the building, and shot recklessly into a residential neighborhood.

“I shot my weapon–irresponsibly.”

According to Fox4, Ovilla police charged Deputy Cox with deadly conduct and booked him into the Ellis County Jail.

But as luck would have it, the very same day he was arrested, the pastor of the churched signed an affidavit of non-prosecution and brought it down to the jail, stating he didn’t want to prosecute Deputy Cox.

Because, the pastor said, “it’s all about forgiveness.”

 According to Fox4,  Ellis County Jail released  Deputy Cox the next day.
He did not have to post any bail.

Deputy Cox was fired, although he apparently wasn’t required to take a mug shot. Cox’s “mug shot” from the arrest obtained by Fox4 through a records request, showed not a picture of the drunken cop’s face, but a picture of the wall people stand against when they have their mugshot taken.


Cox once worked as a jailer in Ellis County.
Ellis County District Attorney Patrick Wilson expressed outrage and alleged deputy Cox received special treatment, perhaps because of his blue privilege, and said officials at the county jail abused their discretion by letting their fellow cop slide on taking a mugshot.
In an in-person interview with Fox4 (seen below), Wilson holds up records of law enforcement from the past who have previously found themselves arrested and posing for a mugshot.
“Here’s another former Ellis County Sheriff’s Office currently working in a different sheriff’s department when he was booked into your jail. Here’s the chief of the Maypearl Police Department who was arrested and booked into your jail. All of their damn pictures are on your system,” Wilson angrily insisted.
“This, in my mind, is a tremendous abuse of that discretion. And in today’s climate, it’s inexcusable,” Wilson disclosed. “I cannot understand how these facts escape the narrative of favoritism.”

Wilson pointed out that it’s that very same favoritism that’s behind growing negative sentiments towards police in communities all across the country.

“The criticism being lobbed against law enforcement and the criminal justice community in general in our community and our society . . . today, the foundation of that criticism is what’s illustrated in this case,” Wilson pointed out. “And that is favoritism that some people in the criminal justice system get treated differently. How can I dispel that narrative when these facts completely support that?”

The district attorney said his office will open its own investigation.

As of now, deputy Cox remains free of charges.



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