NYPD Caught on Video Repeatedly Punching Subdued Man - PINAC News
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NYPD Caught on Video Repeatedly Punching Subdued Man

New York City police officers were caught on video repeatedly punching a man in the face as they pinned him to a floor splattered with blood.

The video posted to Instagram Friday shows two cops and one bystander who decided to jump in to help the cops.

As other witnesses criticize the cops for punching the suspect, the man helping the cops claims he wouldn’t get punched if only he would stop fighting.

But the man does not appear to be fighting in the 26-second video.

However, NYPD told the New York Daily News they have a longer video that shows the man punching a cop, breaking his nose.

However, they did not release that video.

The incident took place on May 4 inside a McDonalds as the cops were trying to arrest Darnell Simmons, 27, who was accused of committing several burglaries.

According to the New York Daily News:

That cop, identified by law enforcement sources as Officer Matthew Wright, is seen repeatedly punching Simmons in the face as he lies on the ground.

At one point, Wright knees him in the face as Simmons squirms on the restaurant’s blood-speckled floor, the video shows.

Another cop, identified by sources as Officer Billy Acosta, is seen holding Simmons down. He has a cut on his head, the video shows.

Police said the incident was reviewed by the Civilian Complaint Review Board back in May, but they found no wrongdoing. They said it is not being investigated by internal affairs, so we already know they will not find any wrongdoing.

NYPD said the two cops suffered significant injuries as a result of the struggle with Wright needing plastic surgery to repair a broken nose and staples to close deep cuts to his head, and Acosta suffering two herniated discs.

The two cops and the suspect were all taken to the hospital.

Simmons is now charged with multiple counts of assault, menacing and disorderly conduct in addition to the initial burglary charges he was facing.

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